PFA Screenings

WHO ELIGIBLE?

An adult or minor who is being physically or sexually abused or threatened with harm by:
     ~~someone related by blood or marriage  
     ~~a current or former sexual or intimate partner
A parent or guardian must file on behalf of a minor

PFA’s CANNOT be filed against neighbors, friends, employers, etc…this is a case for law enforcement and a PFA does not apply here.

TEMPORARY AND FINAL PFA ORDERS:

  1. When requesting a Protection From Abuse order, the victim must go to the PFA office at the courthouse; a Crisis Shelter advocate will be called.
  2. When filing a temporary PFA, the victim may be at the courthouse for an extended period of time; the Judge may have other hearings scheduled.
  3. The victim will need to call the attorney whose number is provided with the temporary PFA for representation at the final hearing.

FINAL HEARING DAY:

  1. The person requesting a PFA should report to the PFA office by 8:30 A.M. On the day of the final PFA hearing, all victims and abusers will be in separate areas at the courthouse.  If a victim is uncomfortable, they can ask the PFA advocate to be put in a separate room to feel safe.
  2. The person requesting a PFA should dress appropriately for court. Inappropriate dress includes shorts, low cut tops, or t-shirts with printed matter on them.  Capris, skorts, skirts, dress pants, and jeans that are free of holes or embellishments are appropriate apparel.
  3. The person requesting a PFA should not bring children to court.  No one under age 18 is allowed in the courtroom and there is no one to babysit.  Only a child who is the plaintiff on a PFA may come to court and will meet with the judge in chambers.  The advocate will accompany the child into chambers.

EMERGENCY PFA’s:

~~Granted from 3PM on Friday until 8AM on Monday (and holidays).
~~Call LEOC at 724.656.9300 or the Crisis Shelter at 724.652.9036 – the Magistrate will then return the call
~~The Emergency PFA will expire at 8AM on the first day court is open, then a temporary order must be filed.

“I always felt really safe at the Crisis Shelter. I felt nothing would happen to us there. The key cards (to unlock doors into and within the Shelter) made me feel safe. I remember how I would take my brother and sister to play in the child care room – I wanted them to feel safe too.”